All posts by Gordon L. Weil

Gordon L. Weil

About Gordon L. Weil

Gordon L. Weil formerly wrote for the Washington Post and other newspapers, served on the U.S. Senate and EU staffs, headed Maine state agencies and was a Harpswell selectman.

COVID-19 reaction boosts state government’s role

States may rely less on federal government for public health, other policies Dealing with the corona virus may be causing a political revolution. The federal government cannot deal with the required all-out effort to combat the virus. It depends on state governments. When the crisis has passed, it’s likely the country will find that the […]

COVID-19 Act unity hides deep partisan divide

Earlier this week, the Senate opened a session with a foul blast of partisanship. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell discussed the day’s schedule and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer responded. Next came a short break when no senator may speak. Sen. Susan Collins asked for agreement of all senators present, called “unanimous consent,” so that she could […]

Fixing coronavirus impact requires major government action

The coronavirus pandemic is illustrating a basic truth about the U.S. We are poor at long-term preparing and better at short-term reacting. The country was unprepared for dealing with a worldwide public health crisis. Even if other countries were similarly unready, that’s no excuse for a country that considers itself and is widely considered by […]

GOP pushes Ukraine issue against Biden, seeking to shield Trump

With former Vice President Joe Biden as the likely Democratic opponent of President Trump in November, Trump and the Republicans will renew efforts to discredit him over the Burisma-Ukraine-Biden issue. They will insist that Biden had a Ukraine prosecutor removed to protect Burisma, an energy company being investigated for corruption.  He supposedly wanted to shield […]

No term limits here: Collins runs for a record fifth term

Term limits don’t work. The alternative, defeat by the voters, doesn’t work that well either. In either case, elected officials hold their offices for long terms.  They have better name recognition than their challengers, can usually raise more money and know how to use incumbency to their benefit. Familiarity with office holders can give voters […]